Practical Chicken Feeding Tips

There’s so much hype around nutrition these days that it’s easy to lose track of the basics. I’ve heard of poultry farmers who wanted to feed their poultry “naturally” and did so by feeding them nothing but whole organic grain — and were surprised when their poultry (turkeys, in this case) started keeling over and dying. But chicken feed is easy, right? What went wrong?

Well, everything!

Chicken Feeding Tips You Need To Know

So let’s review some practical chicken feeding tips, which will apply pretty well to ducks and turkeys as well: read more...

Day-Old Baby Chick Checklist: How to Prepare For Them and Care For Them

 beth_and_baby_chicks_smThe Most Comprehensive Baby Chick Checklist Anywhere!

Raising day-old baby chicks isn’t hard, and is delightful when everything turns out right. but doing it right involves a number of steps. You’ll have more success and fewer surprises if you use this handy checklist to stay on track.

Where Do These Tips Come From?

Success With Baby Chicks by Robert PlamondonThis checklist is adapted from my book, Success With Baby Chicks, available in paperback and as an eBook. Many items in the checklist refer to the individual chapters in the book that will give you lots of detailed information.

I spent years learning all the tricks of the trade before writing this book. When I started, my results with baby chicks weren’t all that great, but now they are, and yours will be, too! read more...

Your Chickens in September [2014 Newsletter]

Baby Chicks in September? Seriously? And Lights for Hens

Robert Plamondon’s Poultry Newsletter, Sept 2014

News From the Farm

Baby chicks drinking near brooderWe’re in the busiest time of the year, but things are moving along pretty well. Our pastured pigs haven’t escaped for a while. Egg production is holding steady. The local predators seem to be finding their food elsewhere. The weather is hot and dry, and the grass is browning off, but this brief excursion from Western Oregon’s trademark “cool, damp, and green” is normal.

Baby Chicks in September? Seriously?

Everyone thinks of springtime when they think of brooding baby chicks, but fall is my personal favorite. It’s warmer and drier, and while things get colder and wetter as fall turns into winter, the baby chicks get older and hardier before the weather has time to get bad. September and October are both good times for brooding in most climates. read more...

Scratch Feed for Chickens

What is scratch feed, anyway?

feeding_poultry_scratch_feed_250Scratch feed is both a feeding method and a type of feed:

  • Scratch feed as a feeding method: It’s scratch feed if you feed it by scattering it on the ground (hens reveal morsels of feed and move it around by scratching at it with their feet).
  • Scratch feed as a type of feed: Whole grains and coarsely cracked grains are suited for feeding scattered on the ground, because they’re coarse enough for hens to find and pick up individual particles, won’t blow away in the wind, and won’t turn to paste or soup on wet ground. Appropriate grains are sometimes bagged up and labeled as “scratch feed” or “scratch grains.”

Why Feed Scratch Grains?

There are different reasons to feed scratch grains:

  • Taming the chickens. A one- or twice-daily feeding of scratch grains will be met with eagerness by the chickens, and if you make them come right up to you to get the grain, it will make them tame. (Chickens fed only out of bulk feeders may never get used to you.)
  • Getting a good look at the chickens. By running up to you, you’ll get a close-up look at the chickens, which helps you spot any problems they might be having.
  • Getting the hens out of the nest boxes. Hens like to laze around in nest boxes after laying their eggs, and egg collection is faster and more pleasant if the hens decamp of their own free will because you’ve just offered them a snack!
  • Encouraging and directing foraging. The chickens will pick up any other yummy edibles that are in the vicinity of the scratch grain, and a bribe of scratch grain will get them to forage when they otherwise don’t feel like it, such as during hot or cold weather.
  • Encouraging feed consumption. Similarly, if the chickens are unwell or unhappy, such as in the aftermath of being chased around by a dog, their appetite plummets and their production falls. But chickens are social eaters, even competitive eaters, and they’ll eat if other chickens are eating — especially if it looks like the food might be gone if they wait! Encouraging this kind of mini feeding frenzy helps keep the chickens going.

How Much Scratch Grain to Feed

The rule of thumb is to feed no more grain than the chickens will eat in twenty minutes. That maximizes competition, which means that even hens who are feeling under the weather will be motivated to eat something. And it doesn’t leave any feed on the ground to be eaten by wild birds and other critters you don’t want to be feeding.

If the hens are happy with their normal chicken feed, they may be satisfied with a small amount of scratch grain. My 400 hens are sometimes happy with only a couple of quarts of whole oats. But the benefit is real even if the quantities are small. read more...